Artist & Worshipper

What kind of a person will sign on with Ember?

As we continue to build Ember I am still surprised as God brings clarity of vision and hones our purpose and direction. As things are dialing in, I’m beginning to see the kind of person who would be attracted to Ember vocationally. There are two types of people that I can see as of now. The first is the person who is sold out to the prayer room — they don’t need to be talked into sitting in a room hours on end worshipping Jesus and joining him in intercession for a geographic region. It is their disposition and make up that keeps them in that place. I think this would be the obvious fit for Ember. But there is another person who is has found their home here.

Enter the creative entrepreneur

Ember isn’t a fit for every creative. The prayer room is a massive filter that draws a particular kind of person. And this is totally fine! Anyone who joins our creative team — music, video, podcasting, blogging — isn’t exempt from the prayer room. The prayer room is what fuels all of what we do and who we are, but there is a different way to approach the prayer room for the individual who has value and love for the prayer room but is not joining the team to spend all of their time there.

Ember is a fit for the individual who desires vocational space to work out their creative endeavor in the context of a creative company committed to bringing glory to Jesus.

It is a lot of work, but it is incredibly rewarding work.

Ember gives a platform, a track, and language to this individual. Where at one time, this person may not have had a vocational outlet for their craft, they now have the opportunity to invite the body of Christ around them to support them in their vocational endeavor as an artist worshipper — bringing glory to Jesus, not only in regular sessions of worship and prayer, but also in the multiplication of the glory of Jesus through their art form.

Example 1 — Stephen Ibach, Media Director for Ember
Stephen’s morning begins in the prayer room. He participates and leads worship for several prayer sets throughout the week. On a particular afternoon, his day may transition to recording and editing our most recent Ember Perspective Podcast — consistently taking the substance of hope cultivated in the place of prayer and multiply it through his area of expertise.

Example 2 — Jordan Solis, Manager of Ember Music
Jordan’s morning begins in the prayer room, both as a participant and as a worship leader. She is a musician with a heart for intercession and worship. Jordan came on board with Ember because of a combined desire to adore Jesus continually in the prayer room setting as well as a desire to cultivate her art as a songwriter and recording artist. She spends her afternoons coaching musicians and songwriters in the writing, recording, production, and distribution of their songs.

The creative arts, multiplying the glory of God

See, I have called by name Bezalel, the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah … And I have filled him with the Spirit of God in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in all kinds of craftsmanship … to make artistic designs for work in gold, in silver, and in bronze, and in the cutting of stones for settings, and in the carving of wood, that he may work in all kinds of craftsmanship (Exodus 31).

I appreciate Rick Joyner’s perspective on Exodus 31 in his article, The Holy Spirit and the Arts

Isn’t it interesting that the first person in the Bible about whom it was said that they were “filled with the Spirit” was an artisan, and not a priest, a king, or a prophet? This should give us a definite sense of the importance that the Lord gave to art in His dwelling place, the tabernacle, which was the prophetic model for His church, “the tabernacle not made with hands” (see Hebrews 9:11).

I’m thrilled by the opportunity Ember creates to bring the Lord glory through the arts in a perpetual way. I’m equally expectant to see who the Lord draws into these roles within Ember in the coming months and years. What an adventure!

 

Phil Rice — philrice.blog
Executive Director of Ember

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